In The Desert Of Seth

By G. B. Marian

On Respecting Spirits

So my sister-in-law contacted my wife and I about an artist who is seeking assistance from people like ourselves. The artist works at a studio that’s supposedly haunted, and he’s decided that he wants to draw the spirit behind the haunting into one of his sculptures. The idea is that he would then remove the sculpture from the studio, put it on display somewhere else, and tell the people who visit his exhibits that the sculpture is “possessed.” Furthermore, he would like this procedure to be completed sometime today. (Apparently, this is meant to take place at a fancy Halloween party.)

I have several issues with this request. The first is that I would prefer to meet this person face-to-face before agreeing to do any kind of spirit work for him. Just based on what little information my sister-in-law has gathered, something about this gig just doesn’t sit right with me. It’s one thing to invoke a spirit and offer it a gift that it can feel free to inhabit whenever it wants, which I see as being perfectly acceptable. But it’s quite another to try and force a spirit into inhabiting that object, with the goal of totally uprooting it from its current home. There are only a couple of situations I can imagine in which this sort of procedure would be acceptable: (1) if the spirit is malevolent and is actually hurting people at its current location, or (2) the spirit is benign and would actually prefer to leave the location, but can’t seem to do so by its own power.

One problem with the first possibility is that no one has reported any harmful paranormal phenomena in this “haunted” art studio. This means that if there is a spirit living there, it hasn’t done anything wrong; it’s benign, and it shouldn’t be forced into doing anything against its will. Another issue is that you don’t put objects that are inhabited by malevolent entities on display for just anyone to see. You bury them, burn them, or chop them up to execrate the qliphothic spirit that you’ve drawn inside. Putting an object like that on display is an extraordinarily bad idea, since it can actually help the entity hurt more people than it could before. Again, this is only assuming that there’s really a spirit residing at this art studio at all, and that it’s actually doing anything harmful to begin with.

If this request had been brought to me a month or two ago, giving me ample time to meet with the client and visit the location, I might have agreed to do it. (Emphasis on “might.”) But I only first heard this request a week ago, and that’s just not enough time for me to gather the intelligence I need. There are just too many fishy elements here. How do I know this place is even haunted? Even if it is, how do I know the spirit isn’t perfectly friendly and happy where it is? How do I know there’s only one spirit that’s doing the haunting? How do I know the artist who’s making this request isn’t just doing it so he can show off a flashy new art piece, with no concern whatsoever for the spirit’s well-being?

At the end of the day, spirits have rights just as the living do, and unless they actively seek to harm us, they deserve to be treated with respect. They aren’t playthings that the living can just push around for their own entertainment. On the other hand, bad spirits are nothing to play around with either. Qliphoth can get pretty mean, and if you fuck with them, it’s like sticking your hand in a hungry crocodile’s mouth. If you do that and you get your hand bitten off, whose fault is it really?

Advertisements

4 responses to “On Respecting Spirits

  1. Lunae Iraes October 15, 2016 at 11:31 am

    It is a bad idea for the spirit and the human. To me, it looks like the artist want to try ‘another kind of art’ just like a kid want a candy.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Erica Mary Eleanor October 15, 2016 at 11:40 am

    Honestly, The artist kind of sounds like a d bag..

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: