Sermon: Halloween—When the Barriers Are Down

On Halloween night, 1963, 6-year-old Michael Myers sneaks into his own house, grabs a knife, and stabs his older sister to death. Then he’s put into a minimum security mental hospital, where he’s treated by Dr. Sam Loomis (Donald Pleasence). Loomis tries to help the little boy—who’s now a diagnosed catatonic—for eight years; then he spends another seven trying to put the kid in maximum security. He tells his colleagues that Michael’s the most dangerous patient he’s ever observed, but they laugh him off. “He’s just a catatonic,” they say, shaking their heads. But Loomis knows something they don’t know, something he can’t really explain. Modern psychiatry just doesn’t have the language to describe what Michael really is, and when Loomis tries, he sounds totally crackers. But he’s proven right 15 years later, when a full-grown Michael suddenly gets a hair up his ass and makes a jailbreak on Halloween Eve.

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The Wild Hunt: HexFest 2018 Met With Protests From Catholic Groups

Hemelt wrote, “Please help us pray for the end of all witchcraft and occult practices and rituals that offend [the Abrahamic g]od and that the HexFest will be stopped, all rituals be rendered useless, and that the evil one may be thwarted in his efforts to lead souls astray.”

Wow. It’s good to know the Catholic community in New Orleans has nothing better to do right now than harass Pagans. I mean, they could be writing letters and sending gifts to all their fellow Catholics in Pennsylvania whose lives have been destroyed by pedophile priests. They could be donating money to all those families to help them pay their legal fees or their therapy bills. But no, clearly that isn’t a priority. Clearly, slipping flyers under hotel room doors to try and convert Pagans (or make them feel unwelcome) is much more important. Clearly, we are a much greater threat to these people than the real monsters that lurk within their own confessionals.

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CNN: Priest Abuse Victims Detail Lifetime of Trauma and Broken Trust

It’s been 70 years since Robert says he was sexually abused by a priest. And in the decades since, his wife and family suffered every day.

“I couldn’t show any affection with my wife,” said Robert, now 83. “My children, I couldn’t hold or hug.”

This is the kind of lifelong trauma endured by hundreds of victims at the hands of Pennsylvania priests.

There isn’t a whole lot I can say about this. I think the situation speaks for itself. But my heart goes out to the victims here. As someone with a family member who has only recently come to terms with being abused while they were a teenager, I can testify that crimes like this do continue to effect people for decades afterwards.

And whenever she hears the word “God,” Carolyn said, flashbacks of abuse keep coming back.

“The word ‘God’ makes me think of him,” she said. “I just feel like my whole life has been a lie.”

Even though Carolyn’s alleged abuse happened decades after Robert’s, she said it was still incredibly difficult to speak up.

“It’s very lonely, especially when it’s your word against God’s,” she said.

BY SET, reading that just makes me want to track down this woman’s tormentor and put a major hurtin’ on him myself! I pray that each of these victims will be vindicated, and that the offending priests who are still alive will all be excommunicated and made to pay dearly for their atrocities. And if I were the Pope, I would decree that the corpses of the abusers who are already deceased should be exhumed and immolated. Yeah, I realize that’s pretty draconian, but the Church has been doing much more awful things to the living for centuries. Burning heretics, fighting the Crusades, de-culturalizing or even eradicating native peoples…and now, covering up the crimes of human predators. Bearing this in mind, digging up a bunch of dead crooked priests and lighting them on fire hardly seems inappropriate in comparison.

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